1991
DOI: 10.1590/s0034-89101991000300002
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Abstract: SERVICE, M.W. Agricultural development and arthropod-borne diseases: a review. Rev. Saúde públ., S. Paulo, 25:165-78, 1991. A review is presented of the interrelationships between arthropod vectors, the diseases they transmit and agricultural development. Particular attention is given to the effects of deforestation, livestock development and irrigation on the abundance of vectors and changing patterns of diseases such as malaria, trypanosomiases, leishmaniasis, Chagas' and some arboviral infections. The quest… Show more

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Cited by 101 publications
(88 citation statements)
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“…This increased participation of males and working age individuals expresses the relocation of labor in the search for employment in areas of greatest risk of transmission, where activities related to agriculture usually prevail, like livestock, hunting/fishing, mining and agricultural exploitation 4,7,14,24,28,31 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This increased participation of males and working age individuals expresses the relocation of labor in the search for employment in areas of greatest risk of transmission, where activities related to agriculture usually prevail, like livestock, hunting/fishing, mining and agricultural exploitation 4,7,14,24,28,31 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, other important determinants of EIR such as emergence rate, feeding cycle length and survival per feeding cycle also depend on the availability of hosts (Charlwood, 1986;Charlwood et al, 1986;Charlwood & Graves, 1987;Burkot et al, 1989;Graves et al, 1990;Service, 1991). Some studies have indicated that increasing livestock numbers from low to moderate densities may increase malaria transmission by increasing the emergence rate of mosquitoes (Focks et al, 1988;Sota & Mogi, 1989).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Such effects may explain the direct correlation observed between livestock ownership and malaria burden in some communities Bouma & Rowland, 1995;Mbogo et al, 1999;Ghebreyesus et al, 2000). The impacts of host availability on these other important predictors of EIR, and on its distribution, deserve more detailed study so that, among other things, the impact of livestock management on malaria transmission can be adequately understood and managed (Service, 1991;Mutero et al, 1999).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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