2016
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101045
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Abstract: Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs for treatment. Based… Show more

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Cited by 60 publications
(50 citation statements)
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References 84 publications
(79 reference statements)
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“…The ageing cochlea is characterised by a loss of sensory hair cells, reduced number of spiral ganglion cells and stria vascularis atrophy (linked to a dysfunction of the Na-K-ATPase and NKCC1 ion channels). 16 In a mouse model of spiral ganglion cell apoptosis, aldosterone therapy was found to improve hearing thresholds as maintaining aldosterone levels, which normally decline with age, improved spiral ganglion cell survival via upregulating mineralocorticoid receptors in the cochlea and blocking apoptotic pathways. 16 However, this conflicts with cardiovascular literature, which largely points to elevated aldosterone levels causing a multitude of CVD.…”
Section: Comparisons With Other Studiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The ageing cochlea is characterised by a loss of sensory hair cells, reduced number of spiral ganglion cells and stria vascularis atrophy (linked to a dysfunction of the Na-K-ATPase and NKCC1 ion channels). 16 In a mouse model of spiral ganglion cell apoptosis, aldosterone therapy was found to improve hearing thresholds as maintaining aldosterone levels, which normally decline with age, improved spiral ganglion cell survival via upregulating mineralocorticoid receptors in the cochlea and blocking apoptotic pathways. 16 However, this conflicts with cardiovascular literature, which largely points to elevated aldosterone levels causing a multitude of CVD.…”
Section: Comparisons With Other Studiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…16 In a mouse model of spiral ganglion cell apoptosis, aldosterone therapy was found to improve hearing thresholds as maintaining aldosterone levels, which normally decline with age, improved spiral ganglion cell survival via upregulating mineralocorticoid receptors in the cochlea and blocking apoptotic pathways. 16 However, this conflicts with cardiovascular literature, which largely points to elevated aldosterone levels causing a multitude of CVD. 17 Oxidative stress was a key mechanism found to induce mitochronidal apoptosis in the cochlear spiral ganglion and hair cells of C57BL/6J mice, and oral supplementation of antioxidants delayed cochlear cell death and the onset of HL.…”
Section: Comparisons With Other Studiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In previous studies, higher serum aldosterone was shown to have a cross‐sectional relationship to lower hearing thresholds, better performance on HINTs, and was protective in animal models . Higher levels of IGF1 were shown to decrease incident HI among those 50 to 60 years of age in a longitudinal cohort, and low levels proved detrimental to hearing in animal models .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 84%
“…In animal models, treatment with aldosterone showed improved or unchanged auditory brainstem response thresholds and was as effective as more common glucocorticoid treatments, such as prednisone . Also in animal models, aldosterone slowed progression of age‐related hearing loss with long‐term administration, improved survival of spiral ganglion cells, and blocked apoptotic pathways …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 95%
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