2016
DOI: 10.1016/j.clnesp.2016.03.049
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: The aim of the current study was to develop a simple, valid and low cost model that estimates total body fat percentage (%TBF) based on measures obtained only with a measuring tape. Materials and methods: The study population was 642 healthy adults (408 women and 234 men) with mean age 41.3 years (18 to 75 years) and mean body mass index (BMI) 25.86 kg/m 2. A full set of anthropometric data including weight, height, perimeters and skinfolds were obtained. The volunteers were randomized into a developing (n ¼ 4… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1

Citation Types

0
1
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
1

Relationship

0
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 2 publications
(1 citation statement)
references
References 0 publications
0
1
0
Order By: Relevance
“…As there was only one published paper on AFM1 in milk from Greece in this decade, bibliographic research included earlier studies and conference papers. Prevalence of AFM1 in Greece (Table 3) was 55.8% ( N = 285) with a mean value of 0.011 μg kg −1 (calculated as Pooled Mean of reported means), and in the range of 0.005 (LOD)–0.05 μg kg −1 [20,21,22]. Considering that most reported values are well below the permitted ML and that the European Union (Greece is an EU member) has the best global food safety systems, it would be safe to presume that there was no significant increase in AFM1 contamination of milk in Greece and that reported values can be used in this exposure assessment.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As there was only one published paper on AFM1 in milk from Greece in this decade, bibliographic research included earlier studies and conference papers. Prevalence of AFM1 in Greece (Table 3) was 55.8% ( N = 285) with a mean value of 0.011 μg kg −1 (calculated as Pooled Mean of reported means), and in the range of 0.005 (LOD)–0.05 μg kg −1 [20,21,22]. Considering that most reported values are well below the permitted ML and that the European Union (Greece is an EU member) has the best global food safety systems, it would be safe to presume that there was no significant increase in AFM1 contamination of milk in Greece and that reported values can be used in this exposure assessment.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%