2015
DOI: 10.1088/0264-9381/32/7/074001
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Abstract: The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in … Show more

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Cited by 2,560 publications
(1,718 citation statements)
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References 62 publications
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“…This section describes the sensitivity of the experimental setup and results for the Advanced LIGO coating sample [29]. The tested coating, produced at Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés (LMA, Lyon, France), was ion-beam sputtered and consists of alternating layers of SiO 2 and Ta 2 O 5 alloyed with 25% TiO 2 .…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This section describes the sensitivity of the experimental setup and results for the Advanced LIGO coating sample [29]. The tested coating, produced at Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés (LMA, Lyon, France), was ion-beam sputtered and consists of alternating layers of SiO 2 and Ta 2 O 5 alloyed with 25% TiO 2 .…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Section III describes our experimental setup. We have used it to measure the coating thermal noise of an Advanced LIGO [18] witness sample. In Sec.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One potential method for detecting a SGWB is to use a network of ground-based, second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, which currently consists of Advanced LIGO [1] and Advanced Virgo [2]. A SGWB from compact binary coalescences is potentially detectable by the time second-generation detectors reach design sensitivity [3].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The interferometer detectors are now under operation and awaiting the first signal of GWs [1][2][3]. It is also known that pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) can be used as a detector for GWs [4][5][6].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%