2016
DOI: 10.1097/wnr.0000000000000596
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Abstract: Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, plays an important role in the central nervous system as a neurotrophic and neuroprotective factor. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in the central nervous system is characterized as an important integrative site to regulate arterial pressure (AP). However, whether activin A in the PVN is involved in the regulation of AP is not well characterized. This study aimed to determine the effect of activin A on AP in the PVN in rats. Th… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…It was initially isolated from porcine follicular fluid and is also known as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) releasing protein, due to its capacity to induce the release of FSH from the pituitary gland (1). Subsequent research has demonstrated that activin A is involved in pleiotropic functions including inflammation, arterial pressure regulation, embryonic development and tumourigenesis (2)(3)(4)(5). As with other TGF-β superfamily members, activin A functions through the serine/threonine kinase pathway.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It was initially isolated from porcine follicular fluid and is also known as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) releasing protein, due to its capacity to induce the release of FSH from the pituitary gland (1). Subsequent research has demonstrated that activin A is involved in pleiotropic functions including inflammation, arterial pressure regulation, embryonic development and tumourigenesis (2)(3)(4)(5). As with other TGF-β superfamily members, activin A functions through the serine/threonine kinase pathway.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%