2009
DOI: 10.1590/s0036-46652009000500011 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: SUMMARYWe report a case of accidental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in a 42-year-old female patient who presented an inoculation chagoma. Laboratory confirmation was based on examination of fresh blood, Giemsa-stained blood smear, immunoenzyme test (EIA-IgG), indirect immunofluorescence (IIF-IgM, IgG) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Only the PCR gave a positive result, and the EIA test was inconclusive. Two treatments with benznidazole were necessary. PCR was the only technique that continued to give pos… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
2
1
1
1
0
6
0

Year Published

2010
2010
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
4
1

Relationship

0
5

Authors

Journals

0
6
0
Order By: Relevance
“…766 -770 Infected dogs have been identifi ed in other parts of the United States, 771,772 including as far north as Virginia. 758,759 Outbreaks have also been described in association with the consumption of sugarcane juice and the consumption of Acai palm fruit juice or paste. Social aspects also play a role, particularly keeping animals in when the insect vector deposits feces containing trypomastigotes at the bite site.…”
Section: Trypanosoma C Ruzimentioning
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 7 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…766 -770 Infected dogs have been identifi ed in other parts of the United States, 771,772 including as far north as Virginia. 758,759 Outbreaks have also been described in association with the consumption of sugarcane juice and the consumption of Acai palm fruit juice or paste. Social aspects also play a role, particularly keeping animals in when the insect vector deposits feces containing trypomastigotes at the bite site.…”
Section: Trypanosoma C Ruzimentioning
“…Trade of wildlife for exotic pet markets results in close contact between humans and NHPs, providing new opportunities for disease emergence (Wolfe et al 1998). Accidental infections have been reported to occur not only by needlestick injuries, but by exposure of mucous membranes to contaminated fluids and skin lesions while handling infected animals (Hofflin et al 1987; Kinoshita-Yanaga et al 2009, Pereira et al 2010; Kirchhoff 2011). This may be a frequent threat in rural communities where wild animals are hunted for subsistence, because carcasses are handled with bare hands.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Because of the increased interest in parasitic diseases, research in both human and veterinary medicine, mainly in the context of One Health (Oura, 2014 ), the potential exposure to parasites in the laboratory probably increases the risk for acquiring parasitic infections. Parasitic LAIs by malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, fascioliasis, or schistosomiasis among others have been reported (Herwaldt and Juranek, 1993 ; Herwaldt, 2001 ; Kinoshita-Yanaga et al, 2009 ; Felinto de Brito et al, 2012 ). The common route of parasitic LAIs has mainly been associated with needlestick injuries, although other causes such as barehanded work or research in the open field have also been reported (Herwaldt, 2001 ).…”
Section: Laboratory-acquired Infectionsmentioning