2017
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101217
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Individuals suffering from Werner syndrome (WS) exhibit many clinical signs of accelerated aging. While the underlying constitutional mutation leads to accelerated rates of DNA damage, it is not yet known whether WS is also associated with an increased epigenetic age according to a DNA methylation based biomarker of aging (the "Epigenetic Clock"). Using whole blood methylation data from 18 WS cases and 18 age matched controls, we find that WS is associated with increased extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1

Citation Types

3
110
0

Year Published

2017
2017
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
2
1

Relationship

0
3

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 130 publications
(113 citation statements)
references
References 46 publications
(58 reference statements)
3
110
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Overall, these results indicate that the epigenetic age of blood relates to some extent to "biological age." Segmental progeria such as Hutchinson Gilford Progeria, Down's Syndrome, and Werner Syndrome are also associated with an accelerated methylation phenotype [46][47][48]. Segmental progeria such as Hutchinson Gilford Progeria, Down's Syndrome, and Werner Syndrome are also associated with an accelerated methylation phenotype [46][47][48].…”
Section: The Epigenetic Clockmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Overall, these results indicate that the epigenetic age of blood relates to some extent to "biological age." Segmental progeria such as Hutchinson Gilford Progeria, Down's Syndrome, and Werner Syndrome are also associated with an accelerated methylation phenotype [46][47][48]. Segmental progeria such as Hutchinson Gilford Progeria, Down's Syndrome, and Werner Syndrome are also associated with an accelerated methylation phenotype [46][47][48].…”
Section: The Epigenetic Clockmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Physical and cognitive fitness is also correlated with the epigenetic age (Breitling et al, 2016;Marioni et al, 2015a). Accelerated aging is also linked to neurodegenerative diseases in elderly individuals (Levine et al, 2015;Marioni et al, 2015a), Down syndrome (Horvath et al, 2015a), Parkinson disease (Horvath and Ritz, 2015), and Werner syndrome (Maierhofer et al, 2017). There are also evidences the offspring of semisupercentenarians and centenarians have a lower epigenetic age than expected based on their chronological age (Horvath et al, 2015b).…”
Section: Long Non-coding Rnas In the Epigenetic Regulation By Human Ementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recent studies indicated alterations in DNA methylation patterns in blood cells as a possible epigenetic marker of accelerated ageing in Werner syndrome [Guastafierro et al, 2017;Maierhofer et al, 2017]. These studies are based on the assumption that the physiological age of tissues can be assessed by combining the DNA methylation levels of multiple dinucleotide markers (CpGs) [Bocklandt et al, 2011;Garagnani et al, 2012;Hannum et al, 2013;Horvath, 2013;Lin et al, 2016].…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These studies are based on the assumption that the physiological age of tissues can be assessed by combining the DNA methylation levels of multiple dinucleotide markers (CpGs) [Bocklandt et al, 2011;Garagnani et al, 2012;Hannum et al, 2013;Horvath, 2013;Lin et al, 2016]. By taking the weighted average across 353 CpG sites of isolated human cells (e.g., CD4+ T cells or neurons) as a metric, known as the "epigenetic clock," the "epigenetic age" of tissues and organs, such as blood, brain, breast, kidney, liver, and lung can be determined [Horvath, 2013] an increased epigenetic age independent of age-related changes in the cell composition of peripheral blood samples [Maierhofer et al, 2017]. A multivariate regression analysis revealed that Werner syndrome is associated with an increase in CpG methylation age of on average 6.4 years, after adjusting for chronological age, gender, and blood cell counts, such as a reduction in naïve CD8+ T cells.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation