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“…Currently, with the wide use of Bt‐cotton, Hv populations appear to be declining again (Caprio et al. 2004; Micinski et al. 2008).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Currently, with the wide use of Bt‐cotton, Hv populations appear to be declining again (Caprio et al. 2004; Micinski et al. 2008).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The decrease in pink bollworm populations during the eradication program was much steeper than the decline observed with the planting of Bt cotton before the eradication program began in Arizona and the declines in other target pests associated with planting of Bt crops in other regions. 2,[49][50][51][52][53][54] While pink bollworm populations declined dramatically, insecticide sprays to control this pest also plummeted. 21 55 By using Bt cotton as part of a comprehensive integrated pest management program, Arizona growers also greatly reduced insecticide sprays against all cotton pests, including those not killed by Bt cotton, saving a cumulative total of $200 million from 1996 to 2009.…”
Section: Sterile Insect Releases Delay Resistance and Suppress Populamentioning
“…In 1996, the numbers of trapped TBW moths began to decline, coinciding with the introduction of Bt-cotton into the area. Nearly 270 km away in NW Louisiana TBW males in traps declined significantly the year before, then increased again in the early 2000s with a subsequent decrease later, showing a cyclical pattern, more than a perdurable area-wide effect on the overall population, 67 putatively attributed for increasing plantings of Bt-cotton (see also Fig. 3 that contains updated information in the average number of males captured this month; from a few hundred in April to several thousand in June.…”
Section: Cycling Of Tobacco Budworm Populationsmentioning
“…Some researchers have speculated that the planting of Bt-cotton is responsible for this decline in TBW moth flights. 66,67 Whether or not this is the primary explanation for the trend, it cannot be ignored that the plan to decrease populations of TBW, first envisioned by Knipling and Stadelbacher,3 has been partially implemented by the (1) release of sterile males that resulted from the cross of a H. virescens and H. subflexa, that occurred before cotton was partially replaced by Bt-cotton; (2) destruction of wild hosts in fallow fields and margin areas surrounding cotton fields aiming to reduce the first TBW generation of the year; (3) augmentation of the parasitoids such as Cotesia and Cardiochiles spp, and the release of Trichogramma spp; (4) and use of B. thuringiensis and nuclear polyhedrosis viruses foliar sprays over wild hosts. All of these activities may have had a detrimental effect on the overall population that is only now being observed.…”
Section: A Hard-to-kill Pestmentioning
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