2016
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100926
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Abstract: Declining muscle mass and function is one of the main drivers of loss of independence in the elderly. Sarcopenia is associated with numerous cellular and endocrine perturbations, and it remains challenging to identify those changes that play a causal role and could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we uncovered a remarkable differential susceptibility of certain muscles to age-related decline. Aging rats specifically lose muscle mass and function in the hindlimbs, but not in the for… Show more

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Cited by 65 publications
(103 citation statements)
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References 59 publications
(68 reference statements)
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“…In men and women, the annual rate of muscle mass loss is reported as approximately 0.9 and 0.7%, respectively, after the age of 75 years (reviewed in [4]). Sarcopenia can be greatly accelerated by physical inactivity and poor nutrition, and loss of function is more pronounced in the muscles of the lower limbs [57]. Sarcopenia can result in severe muscle weakness and contributes to frailty, reduced mobility, diminished independence, and an increased susceptibility to falls and fractures, with escalating costs to the global healthcare system [8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In men and women, the annual rate of muscle mass loss is reported as approximately 0.9 and 0.7%, respectively, after the age of 75 years (reviewed in [4]). Sarcopenia can be greatly accelerated by physical inactivity and poor nutrition, and loss of function is more pronounced in the muscles of the lower limbs [57]. Sarcopenia can result in severe muscle weakness and contributes to frailty, reduced mobility, diminished independence, and an increased susceptibility to falls and fractures, with escalating costs to the global healthcare system [8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Neuromuscular dysfunction is a likely etiology of sarcopenia (Pannerec et al., 2016). Age‐associated changes occur not only in muscle and nerve, but also at the interface between the two, the NMJ.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Fragmentation of AChRs was noted in our study, and irregular and granular endplate fragmentation has been previously noted in aged mice (Balice‐Gordon, 1997; Chai et al., 2011; Pannerec et al., 2016; Valdez et al., 2012; Willadt, Nash & Slater, 2016). Pannerec et al.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Further challenges in cell- and biomaterial-based therapies in the context of skeletal muscle regeneration include having precise control over immune-modulation, as well as effective stimulation of innervation and vascularization. For instance, MuSCs play an important role in forming neuromuscular junctions [23], where quality of neuromuscular junction and motoneuron innervation is important for normal muscle function and susceptibility sarcopenia in rodents and human [24]. This suggests that modulating innervation of the transplanted MuSCs is an important consideration for cell- and biomaterial-based therapy to improve regenerative outcomes in both acute injury and aging contexts.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%