2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1807-59322011000100012
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Abstract: OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion, nortriptyline and combination therapy and describe factors associated with treatment success.INTRODUCTION:Clinical trials clearly demonstrate the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in smoking cessation. However, it is only after its use in real‐life settings that clinical effectiveness and limitations of a treatment are fully known.METHODS:Patients attended a four‐session cognitive‐behavioral program and received medicines free … Show more

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Cited by 16 publications
(22 citation statements)
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References 24 publications
(22 reference statements)
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“…Prado et al 39 , in a pragmatic clinical trial (non-randomized and non-controlled) carried out in 868 smokers (31.2% men and 68.8% women) with a mean score at the Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) of 6 (± 2), mean monoximetry of 22 ppm, mean daily consumption of 25 (± 20) cigarettes and mean tobacco load of 39.7 packyears, observed a point rate of smoking abstinence of 33.6% in 52 weeks. Among the pharmacological treatments available, the use of nortriptyline-nicotine association was related to higher abstinence rate at one year (46.4%) with OR: 1.37 (95%CI: 1.01 -2.83, p <0.05), compared to the other groups.…”
Section: Smoking Cessationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These therapies include nicotine replacement therapies such as gums and patches, the antidepressant bupropion (Zyban®), and the partial α4β2* nicotinic agonist varenicline (Chantix®) (Cummings and Mahoney, 2006; Jorenby et al, 2006). Unfortunately, the efficacy of these treatments remains quite modest with only 20% of patients remaining abstinent after one year (Prado et al, 2011). Consequently, there remains an essential need for more effective pharmacotherapy than existing treatments.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In a real life study to compare effectiveness of NRT, bupropion, nortriptyline and combination therapy and to describe factors associated with treatment success, Prado et al sustain their point of view, in agreement with the findings from the meta-analysis of Wagena et al, 70 that nortriptyline is a significant treatment option, given its efficacy (comparable to those first-line options), safety and, especially, its low cost and wide availability. In their opinion, perhaps, considering the threat of a global tobacco epidemic -and even more significant impacts on the less affluent nations -the inclusion of nortriptyline in the therapeutic arsenal of smoking cessation may be a promising step towards a wider access to treatment, especially in developing countries.…”
Section: Practical Points For Using Nortriptylinesupporting
confidence: 52%
“…However, the major limitation of this report is that it was a retrospective, uncontrolled and not randomized study and available options of treatment regimens were chosen by individual criteria on a case-by-case basis or according to the availability of medication in the public health system. 70 Clinicians need to be aware of the side effect profile and the lack of EMEA and FDA approval for nortriptyline as a tobacco dependence treatment. This medication should be considered for treating tobacco use only under a physician's supervision and in those patients unable to use first-line medications because of contra-indications or just in patients who have been unable to quit using first-line medications.…”
Section: Practical Points For Using Nortriptylinementioning
confidence: 99%
“…The effects of cigarette smoke on the cardiovascular system underlie the adverse effects of smoking on cardiovascular (1,2) and brain health, (3-5) in addition to detrimental effects in different systems (6-8). Cigarette smoke is classified into 2 categories: the mainstream smoke usually inhaled by active smokers and the sidestream smoke emitted from a cigarette and inhaled by so-called “passive smokers.” Sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS) is known to contain greater amounts of various oxidants and other harmful compounds than mainstream smoke (9).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%