2018
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101590
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Abstract: Human DNA-methylation data have been used to develop highly accurate biomarkers of aging ("epigenetic clocks"). Recent studies demonstrate that similar epigenetic clocks for mice (Mus Musculus) can be slowed by gold standard anti-aging interventions such as calorie restriction and growth hormone receptor knock-outs. Using DNA methylation data from previous publications with data collected in house for a total 1189 samples spanning 193,651 CpG sites, we developed 4 novel epigenetic clocks by choosing different … Show more

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Cited by 132 publications
(216 citation statements)
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References 75 publications
(216 reference statements)
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“…Our understanding of the ageing process has historically been hampered by the lack of tools to accurately measure it. In recent years, epigenetic clocks have emerged as powerful biomarkers of the ageing process across mammals [5,6], including humans [7][8][9], mouse [10][11][12][13][14], dogs and wolves [15] and humpback whales [16]. Epigenetic clocks are mathematical models that are trained to predict chronological age using the DNA methylation status of a small number of CpG sites in the genome.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Our understanding of the ageing process has historically been hampered by the lack of tools to accurately measure it. In recent years, epigenetic clocks have emerged as powerful biomarkers of the ageing process across mammals [5,6], including humans [7][8][9], mouse [10][11][12][13][14], dogs and wolves [15] and humpback whales [16]. Epigenetic clocks are mathematical models that are trained to predict chronological age using the DNA methylation status of a small number of CpG sites in the genome.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Interestingly, deviations of the epigenetic (biological) age from the expected chronological age (aka epigenetic age acceleration or EAA) have been associated with many conditions in humans, including timeto-death [17,18], HIV infection [19], Down syndrome [20], obesity [21], Werner syndrome [22] and Huntington's disease [23]. In mice, the epigenetic clock is slowed down by dwarfism and calorie restriction [11][12][13][14]24] and is accelerated by ovariectomy and high fat diet [10,13]. Furthermore, in vitro reprogramming of somatic cells into iPSCs reduces epigenetic age to values close to zero both in humans [8] and mice [11,14], which opens the door to potential rejuvenation therapies [25,26] Epigenetic clocks can be understood as a proxy to quantify the changes of the epigenome with age.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For the rDNA methylation clock reads were mapped to BK000964 and the coordinates were adjusted accordingly 26 . 70/72 sites were covered for rDNA clock, compared to 102/435 sites of whole lifespan multi-tissue clock 27 , or 248/582 and 77,342/ 193,651 sites (ridge) of two entire lifespan multi-tissue clocks 28 .…”
Section: Quantification Of Optic Nerve Axonsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Genomic DNA from FACSisolated RGCs was obtained from retinas that are intact or 4-days after axonal injury in the presence or absence of OSK induction and subjected reduced-representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). A newly published rDNAme clock 26 provided the best site coverage (70/72 CpG sites) relative to other available mouse clocks 27,28 , and its age estimate remained highly correlated with chronological age of RGCs (Extended Data Fig. 7a and Methods).…”
mentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Impaired epigenetic control with aging has been proposed as an etiological factor common to age-related diseases ranging from diabetes to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease [13][14][15][16][17][18]. DNA methylation has been widely studied in geroscience research as methylation at specific loci tracks with chronological aging [19][20][21][22] and can potentially be an indicator of 'biological' aging [23,24]. DNA methylation primarily occurs in a CpG context, however non-CpG methylation is abundant in the central nervous system (CNS) [1,25] and has only been minimally examined with aging [26,27].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%