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“…five tonnes per year) is excavated from these deposits. Eight fossils of different families within the Polypodiales and many sporangia and spores have been found in Burmese amber (Poinar & Buckley, 2008;Schneider et al, 2016;Regalado et al, 2017aRegalado et al, , 2017bRegalado et al, , 2018Regalado et al, , 2019Li et al, 2018Li et al, , 2019 and several taxa await description. Four fern species were described from Dominican amber, so far (Gómez, 1982;Lóriga et al, 2014;Schneider et al, 2015;Sundue & Poinar, 2016).…”
Section: Fern Diversity In Baltic Ambermentioning
“…This study demonstrates the value of new discoveries in broadening our understanding of the complexity of the vegetation that grew in ancient landscapes. Heinrichsia cheilanthoides, together with recently discovered fossils of members of several other fern families, including Thyrsopteridaceae, Cystodiaceae, Dennstaedtiaceae, Lindsaeaceae, and eupolypods incertae sedis, in Burmese amber (Poinar & Buckley, 2008;Regalado et al, 2017aRegalado et al, , 2017bRegalado et al, , 2018bSchneider et al, 2016b;Li et al, 2018Li et al, , 2019, suggests that the Cretaceous amber forests of Myanmar were characterized by a rich fern flora, which appears to have been dominated by polypods based on the evidence gathered to date (Schneider et al, 2016b). We are well aware of the facts that this assessment is very preliminary and that detailed observations of many more specimens and forms will be necessary to complete the inventory of ferns in Burmese amber.…”
Section: Concluding Remarkmentioning
“…In the recent years, it has been found that approximately 100 million-year-old Myanmar ambers provide a unique source of polypod fossils. Eight fossils of different families and numerous sporangia, spores, and scales have been found in Myanmar ambers [6] [10]- [15], including eupolypod-like fossil Cretacifilix fungiformis [10], the first compelling eupolypod fossil Holttumopteris burmensis [6], eupolypod fossil scales, and spores ( Figure 2). All these findings suggest that a diversity of eupolypod ferns was present already in the mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber forests, clearly showing that Eupolypods originated before mid-Cretaceous, probably as early as the Early Jurassic, consistent with the divergence time estimates from the study of Testo and Sundue [5].…”
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