2008
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.144.3.366
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A Human Papillomavirus–Associated Disease With Disseminated Warts, Depressed Cell-Mediated Immunity, Primary Lymphedema, and Anogenital Dysplasia

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Cited by 48 publications
(36 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
(43 reference statements)
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“…To date, only two such cases have been reported in the literature. 29,30 One patient eventually developed SCC of the foot and groin. 30 Both patients lacked the typical EV histologic features and HPV typing did not reveal the typical EV-defining HPV types.…”
Section: Wild Syndromementioning
confidence: 99%
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“…To date, only two such cases have been reported in the literature. 29,30 One patient eventually developed SCC of the foot and groin. 30 Both patients lacked the typical EV histologic features and HPV typing did not reveal the typical EV-defining HPV types.…”
Section: Wild Syndromementioning
confidence: 99%
“…30 Both patients lacked the typical EV histologic features and HPV typing did not reveal the typical EV-defining HPV types. 29,30 Further genetic and biochemical studies are needed to expand our limited knowledge of this rare disease, currently named based on its outstanding clinical characteristics: warts, immunodeficiency, lymphedema, and dysplasia.…”
Section: Wild Syndromementioning
confidence: 99%
“…HPVs can be divided into cutaneous types commonly found in common warts, mucosal types detected in genital condylomas and anogenital cancers and epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) types [5,6]. EV is a rare genodermatosis associated with infections with specific HPVs belonging to the β genus of HPV [7]. Some of the cutaneous HPVs of the genus β have been suggested as a co-factor in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) [1,8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, it has also been associated with both acquired immune defects, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and organ transplantation, and primary immunodeficiencies, such as CVID, X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) M immunodeficiency syndrome, and Wilskott-Aldrich syndrome, among others [1][2][3][4]. Interestingly, it has been described in both immunodeficiencies that involve T cells and those that involve B cells.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%