2013
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100605
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Abstract: Loss of germline precursor cells in C. elegans has previously been shown to improve protein homeostasis and extend lifespan, possibly due to reallocation of resources to somatic cells. In contrast, mutants that are sterile simply due to loss of sperm or oocyte production have a normal lifespan, often leading to the conclusion that loss of reproduction per se may have minor effects on C. elegans. We have found that inhibiting reproduction in C. elegans via the DNA synthesis inhibitor 5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine (FU… Show more

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Cited by 33 publications
(34 citation statements)
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References 38 publications
(58 reference statements)
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“…Finally, either treatment significantly protected C. elegans against thermal stress at 35 °C (Fig. 4C), consistent with other reports (Angeli et al, 2013). We conclude that FUdR increases stress resistance by inhibiting thymidylate synthase.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 92%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Finally, either treatment significantly protected C. elegans against thermal stress at 35 °C (Fig. 4C), consistent with other reports (Angeli et al, 2013). We conclude that FUdR increases stress resistance by inhibiting thymidylate synthase.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 92%
“…For example, 5’-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR), which is commonly used to sterilize self-fertile C. elegans for aging experiments, has a negligible impact on C. elegans lifespan under standard conditions (Mitchell et al, 1979). Several laboratories have reported that FUdR has hormetic effects on C. elegans lifespan in specific genetic backgrounds/culture conditions (Aitlhadj and Stürzenbaum, 2010; Angeli et al, 2013; Mitchell et al, 1979; Van Raamsdonk and Hekimi, 2011). Additionally, FUdR treatment increases C. elegans resistance to environmental and cellular stressors, but the site of FUdR action is disputed and the precise mechanism of FUdR action is unclear (Angeli et al, 2013; Feldman et al, 2014; Mendenhall et al, 2009; Miyata et al, 2008; Rooney et al, 2014).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This is a nearly 20% longevity difference in favor of hermaphrodites. Similar results were obtained when animals were grown on media lacking the DNA synthesis inhibitor FUdR (5‐fluoro‐2‐deoxyuridine; Figure S1), which is generally used in C. elegans lifespan assays to confer sterility to the treated animals and known to affect longevity in the wild‐type at higher temperatures (Angeli et al., 2013). The tendency of hermaphrodites to live longer than males was also evident when populations were maintained at 20°C (Figure S2).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, recent studies have revealed that FUdR extends the lifespan of some mutant worms, including tub-1 and gas-1 mutants, but the mechanism has not been elucidated (Aitlhadj and Stürzenbaum, 2010;Van Raamsdonk and Hekimi, 2011). In addition, it was reported that inhibition of DNA synthesis by FUdR improves protein homeostasis and increases stress resistance, extending healthspan via a fertility pathway that regulates sexual development (Angeli et al, 2013). Therefore, studies on the side effects of FUdR on worm lifespan are needed.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%