2016
DOI: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2015.12.004
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A comparative study of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in sylvatic mammals from a protected and a disturbed area in the Argentine Chaco

Abstract: Understanding the complex epidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles requires comparative studies in widely different environments. We assessed the occurrence of T. cruzi infection in sylvatic mammals, their infectiousness to the vector, and parasite genotypes in a protected area of the Argentine Chaco, and compared them with information obtained similarly in a nearby disturbed area. A total of 278 mammals from >23 species in the protected area were diagnosed for T. cruzi infection using xenodiagnos… Show more

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Cited by 10 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…Unprecedented as they may be as complex co-infections, the diversity of individual kinetoplastids we report is not unexpected. Every recent trypanosome survey of bats has revealed novel parasite genotypes, host- and/or geographic range [ 8 , 43 50 ], with particular surges in discovery following intensified sampling (e.g., transcontinental archival analysis) [ 8 ] or innovative approach (e.g., coalescent species delimitation) [ 43 ]. The 18S rRNA deep sequencing in bats here identifies further diversity around the most basal T .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Unprecedented as they may be as complex co-infections, the diversity of individual kinetoplastids we report is not unexpected. Every recent trypanosome survey of bats has revealed novel parasite genotypes, host- and/or geographic range [ 8 , 43 50 ], with particular surges in discovery following intensified sampling (e.g., transcontinental archival analysis) [ 8 ] or innovative approach (e.g., coalescent species delimitation) [ 43 ]. The 18S rRNA deep sequencing in bats here identifies further diversity around the most basal T .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a zoonosis: dogs, cats and rodents associated with households are reservoir hosts, with evidence of a positive association between the number of infected dogs and the prevalence of human infection [5]. A wide range of sylvatic mammals carry T. cruzi infection [6].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There are many reports of trypanosomes infecting D. rotundus . Several microscopical surveys and experimental infection in mice (Hoare, 1972; Marinkelle, 1976), and molecular studies (Ramírez et al, 2014; Pinto et al, 2015; Argibay et al, 2016; Da Costa et al, 2016; Orozco et al, 2016) have detected T. cruzi in D. rotundus captured in Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, and Ecuador. Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and T dionisii, which are phylogenetically closely related to T. cruzi, were also identified in D. rotundus from Brazil (Cavazzana et al, 2010; Lima et al, 2015b; Lourenço et al, 2018; Pegorari et al, 2018), and Argentina (Argibay et al, 2016).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, Neotropical bats are hosts for a large and underestimated diversity of trypanosomes that have been unraveled using molecular phylogenetic approaches. The current knowledge on the genetic diversity of trypanosomes infecting hematophagous bats suggests a great diversity of trypanosomes in D. rotundus (Barros et al, 2008; Cavazzana et al, 2010; Ramírez et al, 2014; Pinto et al, 2015; Argibay et al, 2016; Orozco et al, 2016), and Diphylla ecaudata (Cavazzana et al, 2010; Lourenço et al, 2018). In a previous study, we surveyed for trypanosomes in 78 D. rotundus captured in southeastern Brazil (Rio de Janeiro) by hemoculturing (Barros et al, 2008).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%