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“…sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus ), and brood parasites 14,36,42 . Hosts’ alarm calls act as a social cue and attract the attention of conspecifics from the adjacent territories 47 , which results in a more effective mobbing of the brood parasite 7 and might increase the probability that a host ejects a parasitic egg 8,46 . Albeit, alarming might be useful for keeping conspecifics or predators at bay 14 , if the alarm calls are uttered near the nest 5,16,35 , alarming might impose the cost of revealing the whereabouts of the host’s nest to eavesdroppers.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus ), and brood parasites 14,36,42 . Hosts’ alarm calls act as a social cue and attract the attention of conspecifics from the adjacent territories 47 , which results in a more effective mobbing of the brood parasite 7 and might increase the probability that a host ejects a parasitic egg 8,46 . Albeit, alarming might be useful for keeping conspecifics or predators at bay 14 , if the alarm calls are uttered near the nest 5,16,35 , alarming might impose the cost of revealing the whereabouts of the host’s nest to eavesdroppers.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…increasing the likelihood of brood-parasitism) might arise from the breeding ecology of the great reed warbler. The great reed warbler is a typical ‘edge-species’ which prefers to breed on the edge of the reed beds and in the narrow reed-stripes found alongside irrigation channels 47,48 . These high-quality habitats, despite being quickly occupied by early-arriving, large-winged and presumably higher-quality males, are characterized by higher rates of brood parasitism 4951 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…In linear habitat types such as large and small canals, the narrow reedbeds along the banks provide the most reedbed edges adjacent to water, which are preferred for nesting by Great Reed Warblers, which typically nest within the first few meters of the reedbed edges. The high nest density in linear reed habitat types demonstrates the strong edge preference of this species (Báldi, 1999;Báldi andKisbenedek, 1999, 2000). The nest density on mining ponds, where the reed structure is patchy, was intermediate compared to those in marshes and fishponds (low density), and those in linear reed habitat types (high density).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Quintuple parasitism by common cuckoo in a great reed warbler nest with three host eggs (a), three host eggs and four parasitic eggs in hand (b), and one parasitic egg buried in the bottom of the nest (c). All common cuckoo eggs are marked with an asterisk The narrow reed beds along the irrigation channels run parallelly to lines of tall trees from where cuckoos can eavesdrop on hosts (Marton et al, 2019), and are the preferred breeding sites of great reed warblers (Báldi, 1999;Báldi & Kisbenedek, 1999). Early arriving, high-quality great reed warbler males occupy these habitats prefer these "edge-habitats" at the detriment of their own breeding success, as previous studies have shown that these irrigation channels have high parasitism rates and act as ecological traps for the hosts Mérő et al, , 2020.…”
Section: F I G U R Ementioning